ROBERT SITLER

sitler-1Robert Sitler’s first exposure to the genius of Maya culture came in 1976 while hiking in the rainforests of Chiapas. Since then, he has spent as much time as possible in the Maya world, visiting regularly among natives from more than a dozen language groups. He completed a PhD from the University of Texas at Austin in 1994 with a dissertation on Maya-related literature under the guidance of the late preeminent Mayanist, Dr. Linda Schele. Bob is currently a professor at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida and serves as Director of its Latin American Studies Program, teaching courses in Spanish and Maya culture. His long-standing relationships with the Maya and their humble wisdom inform and inspire this book. The author’s personal experiences with Maya have been complemented by formal study of Maya culture and exploration of its ancient cities.

Robert Sitler’s first exposure to the genius of Maya culture came in 1976 while hiking in the rainforests of Chiapas. Since then, he has spent as much time as possible in the Maya world, visiting regularly among natives from more than a dozen language groups. He completed a PhD from the University of Texas at Austin in 1994 with a dissertation on Maya-related literature under the guidance of the late preeminent Mayanist, Dr. Linda Schele. Bob is currently a professor at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida and serves as Director of its Latin American Studies Program, teaching courses in Spanish and Maya culture. His long-standing relationships with the Maya and their humble wisdom inform and inspire this book. The author’s personal experiences with Maya have been complemented by formal study of Maya culture and exploration of its ancient cities. He is a regular participant in professional meetings with Maya scholars in Guatemala and the United States. Recently he has focused on the significance of year 2012 in the Maya Long Count and the Guatemalan highland community of Todos Santos Cuchumatán. His CV includes numerous academic articles and presentations concerning Maya culture and the year 2012. In particular, he has worked to include more Maya perspectives in the discourse on the significance of 2012. He travels frequently to the most remote corners of Mexico and Guatemalan to learn from elders in various Maya language communities. The diversity and depth of Bob’s experience among the Maya has been facilitated by study with accomplished teachers in Hinduism, Tibetan Buddhism and from elsewhere in Native America. At Stetson University, he is a leading advocate for environmental responsibility and community service. He enjoys regular free diving in Florida springs, collaborating with local Mexican farmworkers, hatha yoga and daily bicycling. He is a dedicated teacher and an impassioned and engaging speaker who can convey the lessons of the Maya with clarity and empathy.

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